Gun rights advocate discusses his Supreme Court win on guns in c - WLBT.com - Jackson, MS

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Gun rights advocate discusses his Supreme Court win on guns in courthouses case

Mississippi's Supreme Court ruled that local judges can't restrict conceal carrying at courthouses. Source: WLBT Mississippi's Supreme Court ruled that local judges can't restrict conceal carrying at courthouses. Source: WLBT
The enhanced concealed-carry license was created in Mississippi in 2011. Source: WLBT The enhanced concealed-carry license was created in Mississippi in 2011. Source: WLBT
Those individuals can get extra training and be given the ability to carry in places that other permit holders can't. Source: WLBT Those individuals can get extra training and be given the ability to carry in places that other permit holders can't. Source: WLBT
The Supreme Court case was focused on one chancery district, but Ward says it will apply to courthouses across the state that tried to overwrite the enhanced carry law. Source: WLBT The Supreme Court case was focused on one chancery district, but Ward says it will apply to courthouses across the state that tried to overwrite the enhanced carry law. Source: WLBT
JACKSON, MS (WLBT) -

Mississippi's Supreme Court ruled that local judges can't restrict conceal carrying at courthouses.

The enhanced concealed-carry license was created in Mississippi in 2011. Those individuals can get extra training and be given the ability to carry in places that other permit holders can't.

That includes guns in courthouses, but not courtrooms.

READ MORE: Mississippi high court: Judges can't regulate concealed guns

"The enhanced carry permit goes with a lot of training and you are tested on it," said enhanced concealed-carry permit Don Warren. "And you have practical experience. You train with it. So, if you go through all of that, I think you deserve the right to carry wherever you need to."

Some local judges stepped in and found a way to keep those guns out.

"Several districts throughout the state decided to write their own orders which in effect actually repealed the law," noted gun rights advocate Rick Ward. "So, what they were trying to do is control it from within when they really couldn't do that."

Rick Ward was teaching the enhanced concealed-carry classes and started hearing about the push back. The only way to address the orders, was to take it to the Supreme Court.

"These orders were illegal," noted Ward. "They knew they were illegal from the beginning and they just banked on the fact that no one was going to take them to task."

Still, some folks echoed some of the sentiments filed in support of the local bans.

"I think that it's crazy," said Sharon Day. "I don't think they should be able to carry a gun anywhere around a courthouse or the courtroom. I think it's dangerous if someone is angry with a lawyer or someone that's taking them to court. You know, they could get them coming in the door."

The Supreme Court case was focused on one chancery district, but Ward says it will apply to courthouses across the state that tried to overwrite the enhanced carry law.

"They'll have to take this down I'm sure," added Ward as he examined the order posted outside the Rankin County Courthouse.

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